Portuguese Language Resources

The time is ticking by and still I’ve not managed to get to Portugal – but I will. With one thing or the other, the big move is hampered and I am ashamed to say, for no good reason, studies of the Portuguese language have come to a crawl also. Hampered studies, now that’s a laugh as in all honesty, there is no good reason why I should have put these on hold.

I know that my move will be sooner than later and, with this the case, I have a renewed vigor and appetite to learn a language that on the outset, appears to be near on impossible to master. No, I’m not a defeatist, far from it, but so often, I have been told, “that’s a hard language to master – rather you than me – Spanish is easier, why not live in Spain”. My thoughts, perhaps that would be a good idea, based on language. No fear though as, before I’ve even considered that idea for much more than a split second, I’ve dismissed the idea. Me, myself and I, do not like Spain – The Land of Illegal Builds and Lost Hope.

My heart is set on Portugal and all it has to offer and, that includes the challenge, of learning to speak what one day, I may consider to be a beautiful language. I long to be able to understand the scintillating magical voice of Cristina Branco singing of the seas and poor. Once I understand her, I shall feel proud of myself.

My language studies I suppose dwindled for no other reason than perhaps, not being able to communicate with Portuguese speakers from Portugal and therefore, provide some sort of encouragement and approval of my efforts thus far. I seem to have made a mistake of possibly putting too much emphasis on getting it right in the first place. I also suspect I allowed myself to be put off slightly due to the lesser extent of available learning material for European Portuguese. I am guilty of providing myself with far too many excuses for not making a greater effort. Many that read this and also find themselves in a similar situation, please persevere. Without doing so, you and I, can’t ever learn.

The internet is a great place for educational material. Some good and some – real crap. Since my initial endeavors and searches on the internet, I have noticed much more available information nineteen months later. Still, the rubbish remains.

Below is learning material from Glovico.org. It is a site that has much free material. For the examples below, I was able to create the tables. Each creation produces a new vocabulary table. Hope the link for Glovico helps others. Do note that other stuff is available also and, the examples provided here, were only lesson one.

One of the problems I’ve found with listening to audio alone is that, it is all too easy to become confused due to the thinking time required. The advantages of hearing the pronunciation of words is obviously invaluable, but with the addition of lists as below, the learning process, becomes easier.  

A very useful guide to some sounds is available at Eric Armstrong’s Voice and Speech Source where this is interactive. It is based on the English-speaking IPA chart (vowels in this case) but should provide a basis to some pronunciations. As an example, words starting in ‘a’ like aborto (abortion, miscarriage, freak of nature and monster), do not have the sound ah but, more like uh. Most EP Portuguese words starting in ‘a’ are as in uh. A dictionary with phonetics displayed is of massive help. In the case of the initial ‘a’ it may be thought that alto (tall, high, elevated) follows the same rule as mentioned above. Not so. Alto, is ‘ah‘lto. Words starting ‘Al’ are a funny bunch to me with the starting pronunciation often being different, I’ve not figured why yet, but suspect it’s to do with a following vowel. I’m using Porto Editora Moderno Portuguese-English Dictionary / Dicionário Moderno de Português-Inglês Porto Editora. So far, I can’t fault it. 

These examples in themselves are of little help here but, it does reinforce that a good quality dictionary displaying phonetics and preferably bilingual, will save countless hours to those self learners attempting to read phrase-books alone. Another point that may be of help to others is that my writings here serve other purposes apart documenting my life changing move and from potentially helping others. It reinforces what I am learning within my own mind and gives a place to save links I personally find useful.

I almost forgot, I also enjoy doing all this. 🙂

 

Lesson One – A

Known VocableForeign VocableTags
Missa senhoritalesson 1
I’m goodEstou bemlesson 1
good morningbom dialesson 1
What’s your name?Como você se chama?lesson 1
kisso beijolesson 1
Mrs.; Ms.a senhoralesson 1
Nice to meet youPrazer em conhecer vocêlesson 1
hugo abraçolesson 1
verymuitolesson 1
good nightboa noitelesson 1
See you tomorrowAté amanhãlesson 1
goodbemlesson 1
goodbyeadeuslesson 1
My name is…Me chamo…lesson 1
friend (male)o amigolesson 1
hello; hioi; olálesson 1
friend (female)a amigalesson 1
How are you?Como você está? (formal)lesson 1
Mr.o senhorlesson 1
I am…Eu sou…lesson 1
good afternoonboa tardelesson 1
this is…(for a male)este/esse é…lesson 1
How are you? (informal)Como vai?lesson 1
My name is…Meu nome é…lesson 1
this is…(for a female)esta/essa é…(for a female)lesson 1
greetingsaudaçãolesson 1
What’s up?O que passa?lesson 1
see you lateraté logolesson 1
(they) aresãolesson 1
What’s your name?Qual é o seu nome?lesson 1
to beserlesson 1
byetchaulesson 1
tootambémlesson 1

Lesson One – B

Known VocableForeign VocableTags
Missa senhoritalesson 1
I’m goodEstou bemlesson 1
good morningbom dialesson 1
What’s your name?Como você se chama?lesson 1
kisso beijolesson 1
Mrs.; Ms.a senhoralesson 1
Nice to meet youPrazer em conhecer vocêlesson 1
hugo abraçolesson 1
verymuitolesson 1
good nightboa noitelesson 1
See you tomorrowAté amanhãlesson 1
goodbemlesson 1
goodbyeadeuslesson 1
My name is…Me chamo…lesson 1
friend (male)o amigolesson 1
hello; hioi; olálesson 1
friend (female)a amigalesson 1
How are you?Como você está? (formal)lesson 1
Mr.o senhorlesson 1
I am…Eu sou…lesson 1
good afternoonboa tardelesson 1
this is…(for a male)este/esse é…lesson 1
How are you? (informal)Como vai?lesson 1
My name is…Meu nome é…lesson 1
this is…(for a female)esta/essa é…(for a female)lesson 1
greetingsaudaçãolesson 1
What’s up?O que passa?lesson 1
see you lateraté logolesson 1
(they) aresãolesson 1
What’s your name?Qual é o seu nome?lesson 1
to beserlesson 1
byetchaulesson 1
tootambémlesson 1

lesson One – C

Known VocableForeign VocableTags
My name is…Meu nome é…lesson 1
goodbemlesson 1
(they) aresãolesson 1
My name is…Me chamo…lesson 1
kisso beijolesson 1
Nice to meet youPrazer em conhecer vocêlesson 1
this is…(for a female)esta/essa é…(for a female)lesson 1
hugo abraçolesson 1
What’s your name?Qual é o seu nome?lesson 1
I am…Eu sou…lesson 1
verymuitolesson 1
to beserlesson 1
see you lateraté logolesson 1
I’m goodEstou bemlesson 1
friend (male)o amigolesson 1
Wha’s your name?Como você se chama?lesson 1
Missa senhoritalesson 1
friend (female)a amigalesson 1
this is…(for a male)este/esse é…lesson 1
See you tomorrowAté amanhãlesson 1
Mrs.; Ms.a senhoralesson 1
greetingsaudaçãolesson 1
How are you?Como você está? (formal)lesson 1
good morningbom dialesson 1
good afternoonboa tardelesson 1
tootambémlesson 1
good nightboa noitelesson 1
Mr.o senhorlesson 1
How are you? (informal)Como vai?lesson 1
hello; hioi; olálesson 1
byetchaulesson 1
goodbyeadeuslesson 1
What’s up?O que passa?lesson 1

 

Facebook
Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn